Tag Archives: London

Broadcasting House, BBC, London

I was at Broadcasting House earlier this week doing an editorial shoot. As usual I had some time to wander the space before getting set up and these are a couple of the snaps I took enroute.

The first is looking down the atrium from the 7th floor to the ground floor. The second is the view from the 6th floor towards Oxford Circus with the unmistakable spire of the Nash designed All Souls Church.


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Time Lapse in Southwark, London

Here is a completed Time-Lapse production shot almost exactly a year ago.  Not a building going up this time but an old Victorian bridge coming down and a new sleek cycle and pedestrian bridge being installed in it’s place.  It was shot over two days, separated  by about 3 weeks.  On the first day we used a two camera setup and had three cameras running for the second day.  Obviously, 90% of the time is spent erecting and dismantling cranes but it is quite fun anyway and the cheesy music eases it along nicely!

Time-Lapse in Middlesex

It has been a busy few months as is witnessed by the dirth of postings here!

I’ve just finished installing a long-term time-lapse set up on a construction site in Middlesex for those pillars of the civil engineering world: Conway.  Time Lapses are slightly curious things that can make even the mundane buildings interesting,  I guess seeing the passage of time (in the case many months) compressed into a minute or two kind of compresses the fascination too.

I’ve developed a PV powered system for this project that will, I hope circumvent the temperature and battery drain issues I’ve experienced in the past, particularly through the winter months.  Short duration projects don’t have this issue but battery drain plagues long term set ups like this one.

So here is how it looks this month:

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View of Excel Conference Centre from over the Thames on the Emirates Cable Car

©Robert Greshoff

View from Thames Emirates Cable car crossing

On a recent trip to Excel, the huge exhibition centre to the East of London, I decided to travel via the (Emirates) Cable Car which runs from Greenwich North straight to Excel.  (For those who don’t live locally but who may find yourselves in need to visiting Excel I recommend this way of getting there!)

The last time I did the trip, the sky was full of those characteristic cloud and sunshine combinations that make the weather here so great (and so difficult) for photography.  Just as I passed the mid point across the Thames and was approaching the north bank, the sun broke through and illuminated the structural spars of the exhibition centre.

To me, the picture has a lovely calm despite the dramatic atmosphere.

The Skinners, a City of London Livery Company

I often find myself in one or other of the various Livery Halls dotted around the City of London (Not as a guest but rather pursuing my own trade for which there is no company!).  Last week I was doing a regular annual shoot for the Architects Benevolent Society who hold their event in a different Hall each year.  This year it was the Skinners and it was one Hall I had not visited before.

For those who may not be familiar with the traditions of this land, the Livery Companies all go back a very long way, (in the case o the Skinners, they were awarded their charter by Edward the Third in 1327) and they are essentially trade associations that exist to protect and promote their particular trade.  There are 108 of them (I have only visited a small handful) and many of them are rather wealthy institutions.  Originally they had strong links to the church but nowadays these links are rather know tenuous but many still do a great deal of charitable work.  The Skinners is a case in point.  In fact the Skinners as a trade ceased to exist a couple of hundred years ago but the company is still doing very well and currently supports four schools in Kent and London, runs Sheltered Housing accommodations and make generous grants to other charities.  And then of course they have their fine building, right next door to Cannon Street station and within spitting distance to the Thames river.

An interesting aside is that in 1484 the Skinners and Merchant Taylors had a argument about who whose barge go in front during the Mayor of London river procession.  In the end the Mayor himself had to intervene and decreed that henceforth each company would take turns to be in front and when the fixed order was finally arranged they alternated between positions six and seven.  This probably gave rise to the phrase “to be at sixes and sevens”

I had a few minutes to kill last week so I made use of my time by looking at things that interested me.  (This is not meant to be a comprehensive study of the hall!)  In particular I really liked the huge chest with it’s impressively ornate locking mechanism in the lid, which was accidently closed and it took all the skills of the locksmith to get it open again and only once he had been given a photograph of the workings!  Otherwise they are all quite self-explanatory.

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More Art Deco Architecture and more Wallis, Gilbert and Partners – The Daimler Garage in Bloomsbury, London

You may think that I have a bit of a thing about Art Deco architecture – in fact I don’t but having shown the Hoover Building here recently I could not help noticing the Daimler Garage on my travels in London.  This is not quite as spectacular a project as Hoover but it is clearly from the same stable despite it’s tucked away location. It predates Hoover by one whole year (!) so certainly springs from the same creative impulse that was driving WG&P at the time.

There is not that much information about the building itself but it was built for the Daimler Hire Company to accommodate their fleet of chauffeur driven hire limousines for the rich, the idea being that you hired that car and driver together for three months at a time thereby by eliminating the hassle of having to buy the car and employing a driver. It was also a “try before you buy” scheme in as much as you got a refund if you decided to go the whole hog and buy a car.  If you have money to burn, I guess it makes sense.

The building itself is home to the McCann advertising agency and there is very little to indicate how exactly the building functioned as it is all now offices where as presumably at least some of the floors would have been garage space.

Anyway here are a few shots of it. (I didn’t do many as I was running late for my meeting and it was a very dull day!)…

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Escalators

   It’s been a busy week or so with great weather which is great for work but less so for doing other stuff. Yesterday, was typical I started to the West of London, then went to Teddington  in West London, then Wimbledon (SW London), the Sydenham (SE London), then Greenwich (SE) and then back home.  Which adds up to a lot of driving and quite a bit of shooting in between, but not much else.  Still, I did find myself in a DIY superstore with some impressive escalators so given the dearth of time I shot those for fun, before moving on to my next location.

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