Tag Archives: Colour

On Friday I was up in the gods again in Canterbury Cathedral shooting Stained Glass for an upcoming exhibition at the Getty.  You get wonderful vistas of the cathedral from this level even if you take your life in your hands to see them!  (Pic thanks to Daniel Steinbach, who joined me up there)

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Been out and about shooting a number of car dealerships today but noticed this when I was unloading my gear at the last showroom in Battersea.  The building is Falcon Wharf, by Burland TM Architects and was built by George Wimpey.  The building won a BHA award in 2007 and although the building itself left me rather lukewarm, I did like the way the afternoon sun revealed the contents of all those balconies and rooms.

Falcon Wharf, Battersea, London, SW11, George Wimpewty, Burland TM Architects

Littlebourne – Queen of the Kent Barns

At last I’ve been able to get into the Littlebourne Barn and it was worth the wait.  It is a fabulous space dating from 1340.  I was given a little booklet by Betty which is so concise and well written, there seems little point in trying to rehash it here, so instead (with permission) I have reproduced parts of it.  It was written by Peter Bell, Lead conservator at Canterbury City Council.

(from the Peter Bell and CCC booklet:)

INTRODUCTION

In Kent’s rich tradition of timber-framed buildings, the aisled barns represent the best of the carpenter’s art.  It was their scale and status in the hierarchy of farm buildings which presented such a challenge to the carpenters of the Middle Ages.  Littlebourne Barn is one of the finest and the best preserved of this most imposing of building types.

EXTERIOR

Littlebourne Barn has all the characteristics of the Kentish aisled Barn: the steeply pitched roof; the long roof slope which sweeps down from the ridge to the low eaves; the oak-boarded walls and the close relationship to the farmhouse and other farm buildings which have long since disappeared.  The timber framed walls stand on brick bearer walls which keep the frame and its wooden cladding away from the damp earth.  They are clad in riven vertical oak boards which are tarred to keep out the weather. The gaps between each board allowed ventilation to the crops within.  The two hipped porches were added in 1961.  The original entrances would have been below the aisle plate.

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

INTERIOR

The barn is 172ft long, divided into 7 1/2 bays.  According to carpenters marks found in the architectural survey, it originally had nine bays. t is aisled on all four sides, ie it has an aisle or outshot on each of the main body of the building.  This was the usual way of achieving greater width that the length of the standard tie beam.  The timber frame consists of arcade posts which support arcade plates, which run the length of the barn supporting the rafters.

This section may help!

Barn Section

Tie beams span between the arcade posts at high level and in turn support the crown posts, collar purlins and collars.  Crown-post roof construction gives considerable strength to the upper part of the roof and resists the tendency of rafters to crack.  It was widely used in the 14C and together with diagonal braces between most of the principal timbers and notably the curved shores between arcade posts and post plates, resulted in a remarkably stable structure.  (with thanks to Peter Bell and the Littlebourne Barn Committee)

And now some pictures: I’ve included a few in colour this time but as before I think in general Black & White work better!

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

Littlebourne Barn, c1340, Kent, England

The story behind the Chagall Windows at All Saints Church, Tudeley, Kent

Stitched Panorama

I didn’t have time earlier to write about the story behind the Chagall windows at All Saints, Tudeley.  The story is an interesting one.  In 1963, Sarah D’Avigdor Goldsmid drowned in a sailing accident.  She was only 18 years old and her distraught parents (Sir Henry and Lady d’Avigdor-Goldsmid, established 20C art collectors) commissioned Chagall to create the memorial window which was given to the church. The work was created by Chagall with his student Charles Marq in Reims and was installed in 1967.  The window shows Sarah as the figure floating at the base whilst her soul ascends a ladder to Heaven, where a crucified Christ awaits. Other figures represent the grieving family.

The windows are inspired, said Chagall, by the words of Psalm 8, especially verses 4-8:

“What is man that you are mindful of him, the son of man that you care for him?  You made him a little lower than the heavenly beings and crowned him with glory and honor.
You made him ruler over the works of your hands; you put everything under his feet: all flocks and herds, and the beasts of the field, the birds of the air, and the fish of the sea, all that swim the paths of the seas.”

Apparently the artist was so taken by the East Window in it’s setting that he agreed to do all the windows to create the only church to completely contain his work.  This project was not without local opposition, some of whom were reluctant to see their Neo-Gothic windows replaced and this is the reason why the final completion of the project was so delayed.  The original windows are pretty mundane so I for one am delighted that the Chagall creations found their way to their places, even if it took 15 years.

Leonie commented on my earlier post that the windows seem to colour the air within the Church and this is indeed the case.  But what makes it even more amazing is the combination of the warmth of the nave area which greets you as your enter the building and cool Chancel with the blue glass creating an almost underwater feel.

What a wonderful tribute to Sarah D’Avigdor Goldsmid.

This panorama clearly shows the different feel between the two halves of the church.

Tudeley, Chagall, Stained Glass, Kent

A Week of Contrasts – Chagall’s Stained-Glass at Tudeley, Kent

After a decidedly monochrome start to my week, today I have been immersed in the succulant and wonderful colour of Chagall’s beautiful stained-glass windows at Tudeley in advance of a pending commission to photograph stained glass at the cathedral.  The  architecture of the church itself is pretty dull but this makes the windows even more brilliant. (For more information visit: http://goo.gl/ogKsr )

Tudeley, Chagall, Stained Glass, Kent

Tudeley, Chagall, Stained Glass, Kent

Tudeley, Chagall, Stained Glass, Kent

Tudeley, Chagall, Stained Glass, Kent

Then tomorrow I’ll be back in the world of commerce photographing a car show-room.  All good stuff.

Remarkable Frozen Lake in Kent , the following day

I revisited the lake featured yesterday a day later, after a long period of gentle but non-stop snow and discovered an altogether more subtle environment.  The crisp, contrasty and well defined round holes were now a much more interesting series of greys and swirling shapes – with foot prints.

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I also stopped to look at the parts that were not yet frozen which were fascinating too, in an entirely different way.

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To make a change from architecture and landscapesI thought I might start sharing some of the images from my SeaPeople Project.  I’ll do this one portrait at a time.

This project began about three or four years ago and has lain dormant for a while although I now have a couple of new shoots in the pipeline which has given it a exciting boost.  It is a portraiture project photographing ordinary people who earn a living from working on the sea, either aboard boats or in a supporting role.

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This first portrait features Martin Cox, the Engineer Superintendent aboard Union Pluto, one of seven vessels for which he is responsible.  Originally he trained as an agricultural engineer before becoming a Cadet Engineer in 1989 working aboard a variety of large tanker and container ships on deepsea routes.  I photographed Martin at Whitstable Harbour on a very wet day in 2010.

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My professional work is all about focus, not (only) in a technical sense but also in the sense of needing to get a particular and predetermined result out of every situation. So to be able to wander around the streets of a city that is not my own just taking pictures, like I did in Amsterdam, is a visually liberating experience.  I don’t do a huge amount of “traditional” street photography but here are couple from the Amsterdam trip…

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Amsterdam 2012

Amsterdam 2012