Category Archives: Kent Architecture

Buildings and other Structures in Kent

#Getty Museum, Los Angeles – #Treasures from Church & Cloister – THE EXHIBITION

I had a welcome message this week from the #Getty including a selection of fine views of the exhibition installation in LA.  Wow! It looks like they and the #CanterburyCathedral Stained Glass team have done an exemplary job.  It is wonderful to see how the images have been used and it is gratifying to see how fantastic the exhibition as a whole and my pictures in particular look  – roll on New York!

And thanks Leigh for sending them across.

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

Canterbury Cathedral, St Albans, Treasures from Church & Cloister Exhibition, Getty Museum, LA

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#Getty Museum, Los Angeles – #Canterbury Glass and St Albans Psalter

Over the weekend a little package arrived from the Getty Museum in Los Angeles.

Getty1LR

The package contained all the bumpf from the exhibition except the book which will be following shortly and it wasn’t entirely unexpected as the “Treasures from the Church Cloister” exhibition opened on September 20th.  Last week I met up with Leonie (Director of Stained Glass at the Cathedral) who gave me a full rundown of the exhibition and it’s installation.  She also said the some of my images are 7m high and they all look great :-)

By all accounts Leonie and her team have done an outstanding job and everybody at the Getty are delighted – it looks to be a sellout show and will be in Los Angeles until February before moving to New York after which the glass panels wend their way back to the Cathedral.

I feel blessed and privileged to have played a part in the project!

Getty2LR

Canterbury at Night and Brassai’s “Paris de Nuit”

One of the most precious photography books in my collection is Brassai’s “Paris de Nuit”.  This was given to me by my father about 20 years ago and is a well loved copy which detracts from it’s monetary value (it remains the most valuable book I own despite the wear) but in no way detracts from the images.  These images, along with those of Sudek have formed one of the back-bone of my photographic education. Interestingly though, I never felt moved to emulate any of their work at the time.  But last year, or it may have been the year before, I spent a number of winter nights tramping around the streets of Canterbury doing a Canterbury de Nuit series.

By way of background to Brassai, this Hungarian born photographer forms part of that rich stream of photographers that flowed out of Europe during the early part of the 20C.  He worked mainly in Paris and died there in 1984, after a life of work in photography.  His commercial commissioned work is largely forgotten now but his legacy of personal work is formidable.

And so to Canterbury at night…

Canterbury Junction Canterbury Junction Canterbury Junction Canterbury Junction Canterbury Junction Canterbury Junction Canterbury Junction Canterbury Junction Canterbury Junction Canterbury Junction

Escaped child at Salvation Army

I’ve been working at the Salvation Army Chatham HQ recently, photographing their new building as well as their rejuvenated old building.  This is a LEllp project and as always, I like to do at least one session with the building in use.

I was invited to come down on Sunday to do some shots of the main hall in use. I got some great architectural views and while I was sifting through the files today I came across this shot of an errant but well-intentioned small child clambering up on to the stage to take his turn at the lectern.

Unfortunately he never made it, despite valiant efforts on his part – but maybe in a few years he will!

Escaped Child at Salvation Aermy

Escaped Child at Salvation Army

Hadlow Tower, Kent – Britain’s tallest folly now folly restored

Here is something I thought I had posted a couple of weeks ago but realised just now that it slipped through without a look in!

I visited the marvellous and recently refurbished Hadlow Tower a few days after it opened last month.  The project has been completed by the Vivat Trust with the support of English Heritage and the Heritage Lottery Fund and sees this once derelict folly restored to beyond it’s original glory – I say beyond because whereas it was not built with any particular use in mind other than standing tall, now it has a real function and houses a pretty swanky  three bedroom house on it’s lower five levels as well as a museum on the ground floor.

The original structures were designed in 1838 by the architect George Ledwell Taylor,for a client who had benefited from a substantial legacy and so  had no need to work but did need to do something with his time.  (the best kind of client, I should think!).  Taylor was recently made redundant from the military, where he supervised a number of mundane projects and the Hadlow Tower was one of his early commissions as a private practitioner and he was obviously relishing the break from military architecture.

Enjoy

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Relevant Links:

The full Wiki article is here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hadlow_Castle

The Vivat Trust is here: http://www.vivat-trust.org/properties.php?pid=121

Ashford M20 cycle & Footbridge – Nicoll Russell Architects with Jacobs

I took some time out after a shopping trip to Sainsbury’s in Ashford recently and strolled over the (now not-so) new foot bridge that joins the Eureka and Warren Business parks together.  Great for getting to the cinema!

It was conceived by a practice based in far away Dundee:  Nicoll Russell Architects and according to their website it is designed to create a kind of memorable gateway to Ashford. Jacobs did the engineering and overall I think it is a success despite gaining early and unfortunate local notoriety as as suicide point  – not something you can lay at the door of the designers who have certainly created a visually striking structure.

Ashford M20 Foot Cycle Bridge, Nicoll Russell Architects, Jacobs Engineering Ashford M20 Foot Cycle Bridge, Nicoll Russell Architects, Jacobs Engineering Ashford M20 Foot Cycle Bridge, Nicoll Russell Architects, Jacobs Engineering Ashford M20 Foot Cycle Bridge, Nicoll Russell Architects, Jacobs Engineering

St Mary the Virgin Church, Fordwich, Near Canterbury, Kent

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Fordwich, Kent ©Robert Greshoff

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Fordwich, Kent
©Robert Greshoff

Popped in to see St Mary the Virgin in Fordwich after doing that traditional Sunday activity of visiting the DIY shop.   This is one of seventeen Kent churches entrusted to the care of the Churches Conservation Trust, a charity who sole function is to ensure that the historical and material aspects of local Churches is maintained and that they can remain open to the public.

Fordwich sits comfortably and sleepily on the banks of the Stour as it winds it’s way to the sea.  The present town bears very little relation to the buzzing place it must have been when it served as the main port for the arrival of Caen stone from France during the Norman reconstruction of the nearby Canterbury Cathedral in 12C and 13C.  Nowadays it’s main claim to fame is that it is the smallest place in the country to have a Town Council and it also has two fine pubs one of which is conveniently opposite the miniscule Town Hall!

Having negotiated my way past innumerable gravestones I arrived at the Church door.  The church itself is very much more substantial than the Romney Marsh building I visited last Sunday and the setting is no where near as unique but that said it does have some interesting features.  I guess from an historical point of view the sarcophagus (that supposedly once contained the remains of St Augustine of Canterbury) is of note. dating from 1100, it is carved with columns and with fishscale tiles on the sloping top  making it look a bit like a Greek temple but but beyond that the thing itself is pretty featureless.

The painting (1688) above the tympanium represents the Royal Arms of William III and Commandments but the best thing about it is the way it exactly follows the shape of the chancel arch below and so serves to emphasise the architectural structure of the building as well as to remind us to be good and pious.

And then there is the fine hand-pumped organ with a large lever protruding from the rear which, no doubt,  someone who didn’t pay enough attention to the commandments above the Chancel Arch was obliged to pump up and down until given the signal to stop from the organist.

And finally, the crowning glory has got to be the curious bully-beef tin hooked on the side of one of the pews.  It certainly never had the honour of holding any relics but what a fantastic piece of folk art – and I have no idea what it was made to hold!

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Fordwich, Kent ©Robert Greshoff

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Fordwich, Kent
©Robert Greshoff

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Fordwich, Kent ©Robert Greshoff

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Fordwich, Kent
©Robert Greshoff

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Fordwich, Kent ©Robert Greshoff

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Fordwich, Kent
©Robert Greshoff

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Fordwich, Kent ©Robert Greshoff

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Fordwich, Kent
©Robert Greshoff

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Fordwich, Kent ©Robert Greshoff

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Fordwich, Kent
©Robert Greshoff